DANNY PATTERSON'S
FAQ
1) What is the symbol on the front of your bass drum and does it stand for anything?   
The symbol is a design I liked from James Avery jewerly.  The design stands for "Alpha and Omega", which comes from the 1st and
last letters in the Greek alphabet.  The reason I like the symbol also has to do with the fact it's mentioned in the Bible in Revelation
1:8

  
I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is
  to come, the Almighty.

Which if it wasn't for God, I most likely would not be playing music.


2) What stick size do you use and have you always used that size?   
I use a combination of sticks / sizes, this mostly has to do with tring to control my volume at gigs.  The main stick size I use (now)
are Customdrumsticks 8D / "Jazz" as well as Promark "lightning rods" and every once in a while a 7A.
Years ago, I used to use Promark 2S (wood tip) sticks, then switched to 2B.  The whole time I used those sizes I would break tips
(and sticks) almost on a regular basis and would get blisters from time to time.  I ended up using smaller sticks after I noticed I
wouldn't swing at the drums with as much force and I seemed to control my volume better.  The smaller sticks last longer (for me) and
my hands don't get blistered anymore.


3) You seem to use a different slide technique than most slide guitar players, can you explain how you tune your guitar
and/or how to play with the slide?
  
Click
here


4) How did you learn to play the drums, guitar and bass?  Was there any albums you listen to, to learn different things for
each instrument?
  
I learned the drums first (so I'll start there).  I've been around music my whole life and was at clubs with my dad even at a young age.  
My 1st experience getting behind a drumkit was one of my Dad's drummers (Larry Martinez) used to let me sit on his drums from
time to time ... I always played an "indian beat" on the toms.  Years later, I showed some interest in playing drums so my parents
bought me a Sears snare drum (which I still have) and I played it for about a year or so before I got unto a full kit.  When I got my
own drumset, I used to practice to these records:  "More Of The Monkees" (The Monkees); "The Eagles" (The Eagles); "Best Of The
Doobie Brothers" (Doobie Brothers) and an Oak Ridge Boys (Gospel) album.  Those were the main LPs I played over and over to on
the drums.  After rehearsing with GIS in the early years (around 1988-1989) I started doing these double bass drum rolls with my
single bass pedal and John and his nephew said "Zeppelin" and I had no clue what they were talking about, so they loaned me "Led
Zeppelin I" and told me to listen to the 1st song ... the drumming on that album made me try harder and harder to play my best.

The guitar and bass guitar were a little different in learning.  My Dad showed me 3-4 chords on the guitar when I was a freshman in
High School and I couldn't never really get the hang of it.  At my school they had a red Harmony Bass guitar (with a bass book and
tape) so I borrowed the bass and book for about a week or two and taught myself the bass notes and chord progressions.  After I
learned the bass notes the guitar came ALOT faster to me ... I started knowing where the notes would fall together and started learning
chords from books and watching other guitar players.  Some of the albums I listened to, to learn the guitar were: "The Sky Is Crying"
(Stevie Ray Vaughan); "Timepieces: The Best Of Eric Clapton (Eric Clapton); "Led Zeppelin I" (Led Zeppelin); "Chronicles, Vol 1"
(Creedence Clearwater Revival).


5) Can you teach me to play the drums (or guitar)?   
This all depends.  I don't teach everyone that comes along and asks.  I like to ask questions first to see what the student would like to
be taught and then I would like to see them play something to judge their sense on timing, etc.  If a student does not have a good
foundation for time keeping I would recommend them learning that before I teach them.  For more information on this subject
click
here.


6) Can I have a one of your drumsticks or one of your guitar picks?   
I do give away sticks and picks at shows for anyone that comes up to me and asks.  I usually always have a pick on me (even if I'm
scheduled to play drums at a gig).  But if I'm playing guitar (only) at a gig I won't have any sticks, but like I said ... it never hurts to
ask.


7) Seen your Grammer guitar on your website ... any chance of some close-ups of the front and back of the instrument?  
Also what serial number is it?
  
I have finally gotten around to getting some close-up pictures of the Grammer up on the site ...
click here.
As far as the serial number ... I really don't give those out unless I've sold (or traded) an instrument ... sorry.
I will tell you that the serial number is four digits long and starts with 14.


8) I've seen you play live and I've noticed you have quite a few bass drum beaters laying on the floor next to your bass
pedal.  What are they for?
The various bass drum beaters I carry with me has to do with me controlling my volume at gigs.  Unlike most drummers I do not
muffle my bass drum very much, as I like a (semi-controlled) boomy bass drum sound and I've found out that just by using a different
beater I can alter my bass drum sound and volume.  The shape and material of the beater can change the way the drum sounds.  And
there are a few times where I do have to muffle my bass drum some and to do that I normally will roll a small towel and place it
against the bottom section of the bass batter head (underneath my pedal).


9) On your CD, Nobody's Fault But Mine, did you really play all of the instruments and how did you do it all?
I did play every single instrument (and note) on the album.  The way I did it was use a multi-track recorder (ADAT system).  First I
would play the guitar and sing on two tracks then play it back and record another instrument on another track and basically repeat
that process until the song is finished.

10) The picture on your solo CD, is it a real house and does it really have a hole in the middle of it?
Yes it was a real house.  The reason I said was is because it was torn down about a week after I had my picture
taken in front of the house and the house did have an actual hole in the middle of it.
Click
here for some photos and here for more information on the house.


More FAQ coming soon ...

If you want to submit a question for Danny send an
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